Monsters, Inc.

To power their city, the monsters of Monstropolis scare children so that they scream. But when a “toxic” child gets through, two monsters realise things may not be what they seem.

In 2001, when I was nine, I’d already been writing stories for fun for as long as I’d been able. But Monsters, Inc. and Pixar’s wonderful approach to storytelling proved to be one of my earliest wake-up calls: I needed to do something creative with my life, and I needed to tell stories. Continue reading “Monsters, Inc.”

Annie Hall

Neurotic New York comedian Alvy Singer falls in love with the ditsy Annie Hall.

In my late teens, I saw 500 Days of Summer for the first time, and hated it. It didn’t help that I watched it with a girl I was hopelessly and unrequitedly infatuated with, but what really got to me was how messy it felt. Like they couldn’t settle on a theme, and how inconsistently it broke the fourth wall, and how fucking true all of it was. Not to compare the two, but if I had seen Annie Hall first, perhaps things would have been different. Continue reading “Annie Hall”

The Princess Bride

While home sick in bed, a young boy’s grandfather reads him a story called The Princess Bride.

The Princess Bride is everything an adventure film should be, and yet it slipped past my childhood unnoticed. I suppose that’s because it’s a cult film. Eurgh, I hate that phrase, but I’m using it (I suppose) to emphasise the modesty of its success upon release, and its quotability. It’s a film people go to midnight screenings of – half to actually watch the film, half to enjoy the company of other “cultists”. Continue reading “The Princess Bride”

Back to the Future

A young man is accidentally sent 30 years into the past in a time-traveling DeLorean invented by his friend, Dr. Emmett Brown, and must make sure his high-school-age parents unite in order to save his own existence.

Today, October 21st 2015, is the day that Marty McFly time-travels to in Back to the Future Part 2. I asked for the Back to the Future box set on DVD when I was about eleven, because the films were always on around Christmas time and I never got the chance to sit and watch start to finish. Continue reading “Back to the Future”

Mary and Max

A tale of friendship between two unlikely pen pals: Mary, a lonely, eight-year-old girl living in the suburbs of Melbourne, and Max, a forty-four-year old, severely obese man living in New York.

Mary and Max is a recipe for cult status. A unique and inherently funny animation style is the foundation for a story about two isolated, lost souls who become friends from different sides of the world. It ticks all the emotional boxes someone like me needs to love a film – it’s funny, bleak, uplifting, deflating… It’s a tough spectrum to experience in ninety minutes, but I managed. Continue reading “Mary and Max”

The Graduate

A disillusioned college graduate finds himself torn between his older lover and her daughter.

When I started University, I was promised that 97% of graduates entered straight into full-time employment, and that tuition fees wouldn’t go up (politics, amiright?!). If I had seen The Graduate during that turbulent time, with its enticing promise of inter-generational adultery, the sheer number of lies might have been too much for me. Continue reading “The Graduate”

Toy Story 3

The toys are mistakenly delivered to a day-care center instead of the attic right before Andy leaves for college, and it’s up to Woody to convince the other toys that they weren’t abandoned and to return home.

toystory3Sometimes, I think to myself, “Man, I wish I had been a kid when _________ came out.” That could be a film, TV show, book, video game… Whatever. But then I realise, I was a kid when Toy Story came out, and I was (almost) an adult when Toy Story 3 came out. I grew up with one of the best animated trilogies of all time, and it grew up with me. Continue reading “Toy Story 3”